Home PageAbout UsOur VetsDonationsContact Us
Eventsforms
   

Robert Haeni

War: World War II
Parent/Wife: Adolph
City: Marshfield
Birth Date: 30 Mar 1919
Death Date: 26 Apr 1945
How Died: Kia
Where Died: Germany
Where Buried: Lorraine, France
Rank: Pvt
Branch: Army

Kia=Killed in Action
Dow=Died of Wounds
Dod=Died of Disease
Mia=Missing in Action

Stories




To some Robert Haeni might just be a name of another World War II soldier but he was also a friend and a son. His bravery and courage in World War II helped bring victory to the Allies. The unit Robert served in was one of the most active in the war. He gave his life for his country.

Robert Haeni, son of Mr. and Mrs. Adolph Haeni, was born on March 30, 1919 in Marshfield, Wisconsin. He attended Pittsville High School, and in April 1943 he enlisted in the military. He received his basic training at Fort Custer, Michigan and went overseas to England in October 1943 where he served as a part of the military police. He eventually went to Germany as a Private in the Army, 7th Infantry 3rd Division. His Infantry was nicknamed "The Cottonballers."

The 7th Infantry 3rd Division was one of the only divisions to fight the Nazis on all fronts. The 3rd Division was involved in many important battles of the war. On January 22, 1944 the division was sent to land on the beaches at Anzio where it held its foot-hold for four months against Germans attacks. On the 29th of February of the same year the Cottonballers headed off to training for the invasion of Southern France.

On August 19, 1944 the division worked its way to the Rhine at Stratsbourg, reaching it on the 26-27 of November. The division took a part in clearing Colmar Pocket between January 23 and February 18 of 1945. On March 15 Robert Haeniís division took part in the strike against the Siegfried Line at Zweibrucken. The brave 3rd Division then crossed the Rhine on March 26, 1945 and continued on to Nuremberg. After a fierce battle on the 17th-20th of April the division pushed onto Augsburg and Munich on the 27th-30th of April.

Robert Haeni lost his life during one of the battles in the push to Augsburg and Munich. He was killed in action in Germany on April 26, 1945 after spending the last two years of his life in the Army. He is buried at Saint Avold Cemetery in Saint Avold, France. His grave number is C 17 71. Robert Haeni was more than a soldier to a lot of people including his friends and family. He gave his life for an effort he believed in. He fought for the love of his country and for his family and friends at home. He is commended for his courage and his bravery. The Allies gained victory with the help of Robert Haeni and soldiers like him.

Written by an East Junior High Student
Wisconsin Rapids, WI

 





To some Robert Haeni might just be a name of another World War II soldier but he was also a friend and a son. His bravery and courage in World War II helped bring victory to the Allies. The unit Robert served in was one of the most active in the war. He gave his life for his country.

Robert Haeni, son of Mr. and Mrs. Adolph Haeni, was born on March 30, 1919 in Marshfield, Wisconsin. He attended Pittsville High School, and in April 1943 he enlisted in the military. He received his basic training at Fort Custer, Michigan and went overseas to England in October 1943 where he served as a part of the military police. He eventually went to Germany as a Private in the Army, 7th Infantry 3rd Division. His Infantry was nicknamed "The Cottonballers."

The 7th Infantry 3rd Division was one of the only divisions to fight the Nazis on all fronts. The 3rd Division was involved in many important battles of the war. On January 22, 1944 the division was sent to land on the beaches at Anzio where it held its foot-hold for four months against Germans attacks. On the 29th of February of the same year the Cottonballers headed off to training for the invasion of Southern France.

On August 19, 1944 the division worked its way to the Rhine at Stratsbourg, reaching it on the 26-27 of November. The division took a part in clearing Colmar Pocket between January 23 and February 18 of 1945. On March 15 Robert Haeniís division took part in the strike against the Siegfried Line at Zweibrucken. The brave 3rd Division then crossed the Rhine on March 26, 1945 and continued on to Nuremberg. After a fierce battle on the 17th-20th of April the division pushed onto Augsburg and Munich on the 27th-30th of April.
br> Robert Haeni lost his life during one of the battles in the push to Augsburg and Munich. He was killed in action in Germany on April 26, 1945 after spending the last two years of his life in the Army. He is buried at Saint Avold Cemetery in Saint Avold, France. His grave number is C 17 71. Robert Haeni was more than a soldier to a lot of people including his friends and family. He gave his life for an effort he believed in. He fought for the love of his country and for his family and friends at home. He is commended for his courage and his bravery. The Allies gained victory with the help of Robert Haeni and soldiers like him.

Written by an East Junior High Student
Wisconsin Rapids, WI

 


News Articles

Haeni Assignment
Haeni Notice

 

  Honoring Our Wood County War Dead